Big Hair~1970′s

Sandra, Tooter, Susan, Sylvia and Sharon

I put the Bridge party on my blog a few weeks ago and everyone liked seeing the girls. It was back in the 1970′s. Today I want to show you some pictures of these same girls and the hair-dos they wore back then. The hair took time to fix and is probably the reason women stopped wearing hats, they just wouldn’t fit on this big hair. You had to roll it on  curlers, then tease or back-comb it and spray with hair spray so stiff you could go through a cyclone and not have a hair out of place. At night you wore a satin sleeping  cap  or wrapped it with toilet paper, that hair-do  had to last  a week. I loved the big hair, it was beautiful, the girls were pretty  and they always dressed in classy  clothes.  They could decorate a room by walking through the door~

Nancy had the happy face and classic look

Christy was the youngest of the bunch, cute and fun

 

Susan was a honey blond

Sharon was as beautiful as a movie star~still is~

Rita~ back when it was black

Becky was our little blond teacher

Dixie had the tallest hair

Madolyn had beautiful hair, always perfect

Pam was a honey blond

Sandra and her 6″ tall beehive

Tooter owned the beauty shop

Sharon always looked nice,she made her own clothes

Pam had a Pixie-Do, it was perfect for her

Susan~no way could she do that herslf

Holly was another red head with great style

Becky was the really truely truely blond

Tooter had red hair~ most of the time

Hey, it’s my blog so here is Spook~she had big hair too, I had this girl for 19 years~

Chicken Pasta

A good summer time dinner

This dish is bursting with flavor, you can spread garlic butter on the bread and toast it, everything just goes together~

I got this recipe from my friend Christy Brown. It is one of the very best. She told me later that she only made it once but it is listed in my recipes as Christy Brown’s Famous Chicken Pasta.  I serve it with hot rolls or French Bread and a big vegetable salad, it is all you need for a great company meal. Make a list of the ingredients and pick them up at the store so you will always be ready. This recipe serves six or more~

CHICKEN PASTA

6 oz. cooked egg noodles (med. size)
3 c cooked chicken
1 can Cream of Celery Soup
1 can Pet Milk
½ tsp salt  (or to taste)
½ can black olives, cut in halves
1 c diced celery
1 c Longhorn Cheddar cheese
¼ c pimentos
1 small can green chilies
1 small can water chestnuts
1 c toasted slivered almonds (save half for topping)
Mix these ingredients and put in a Pyrex baking dish
that has been sprayed with Pam.
Top with remaining almonds and some buttered breadcrumbs.
Heat in 325 oven, loosely covered with foil for 15 min.
then remove foil and heat another 15 minutes or until it is bubbling hot.

Country Church at Art, Texas

Country Church

This is an old stone Methodist Church near Art Texas, population 18

Between Mason and Llano,Texas  there is a place called Art, population 18. This old stone Methodist Church stands out there in the country  by itself. It is picture perfect with huge live oak trees, lush grass and just another wonderful scene in the Texas Hill Country.  It was built by early German settlers to the area. In the spring time the pasture is covered in bluebonnets and wild flowers, and it is beautiful any time of the year. I painted this scene several times at different seasons. My grandmother grew in the area around Loyal Valley and Camp San Saba near here and remembered a few of the last Indian raids. She had lots of stories from her childhood. This is a sweet part of the Texas Hill Country. Bluebonnet time is over for the season but everything is green and beautiful, the Indian Blankets are stunning.

Miniature Den

 

The little den

these little sofas are 6″ high, they sit on the fireplace hearth. My dogs have all tried to sit on them, they recognize what they are~

 

Jitter Joe

Jitter Joe used to lie on these sofas, he still tries but they are  uncomfortable now that he is a big boy~

More miniatures this morning, this is a copy of the furniture in my den, the sofas have been recovered since I made the little ones, I planned to recover the miniatures but like to remember them them as they were when we first built the house. They sit on the fireplace hearth and decorate that area. As I have said before, all my dogs have recognized what they are and have sat on them. I have a living room but the den is where everyone congregates. Most of the time the doors are open to the screened porch. I remember the excitement of making all the little things. If you have ever made a little  chair or carved something tiny, you know what I mean. We may be  wired a little bit different~

Country Road

Old live oak tree

this is typical of live oak trees, they have been through a lot and it shows, still they keep going~

A painting of an old oak tree out on a ranch road in Schleicher County, and one of the ornate frames I told you about in an earlier blog, I like these frames because they go well with landscapes, water scenes, portraits, and just about anything I paint. They do more than just hold a painting on the wall, they compliment it. Hobby Lobby carries nice ready made frames in different sizes and the corners are finished, they are reasonably priced. Most of my frames come from the TWT Company in Brownwood, they are finished in real gold leaf and some are hand carved. The scene from this painting is near a pasture where my sisters and I use to hunt ‘chigger toes’ in the spring. Those are little red fruits that grow on the top a round pincushion cactus. They look like small red peppers but are are sweet and tasty. I still look for them in the pastures around my house~it is exciting~ like finding Easter eggs~or your lost keys~

Mallard Duck

Stanley Duck

the real Stanley had a sister, Rose Olive, those names have been used for many of our pets

This is a carved mallard duck, his name is Stanley. He came in two large chunks of wood and I used a carpet knife to make him look like one of the two real pet ducks  I had for 8 years. It took me about 16 hours to do the work with the knife, then several days to paint him. By the time I finished, I was loving him just like the real Stanley. He is about 18 inches long~ life size. On the underside I wrote a note to remember what was going on with my family at that time and how old the boys were. (I have also written on the bottoms of drawers on my favorite furniture so I can recall the thrill of the day I got it and what time in our lives it happened, like a journal you could say). I got my two real  mallard ducks in 1976, when they were two days old, I built them a duck house, they had the water trough and a big yard. You never know how wonderful feathered pets can be until  you have had them. In the years since then, Debbie has had Katie Mae, Algeritta, Sarah Kate, and several others.(Sara Kate and Katie Mae were invited into the kitchen on Christmas Eve every year to enjoy a pint of fat earth worms from Wal Mart!) Anna has had the 21 peacocks and 7 pet chickies, there have been at least 8 parakeets through the years, most of them named Blue Boy. Birds make nice pets. They are beautiful and smart,  most of all, they love you back~

Thoroughbred Horse

A thoroughbred horse

I painted this thoroughbred horse for practice

Not Bob's Quarter Horse

This is the first picture I painted of Bob’s quarter horse, I had to start over from scratch, another lesson learned ~

This picture today is a thoroughbred horse I painted for practice. I have painted a lot of horses in the last 60 years and it has always been a pleasure. People treasure their horses, there is a special bond between them. Ranchers use quarter horses in Texas,  I painted a quarter horse  for someone who was giving it to her husband for Christmas one year.  She gave me a photograph to go by, mesquite tree, calache road and their recognizable ranch land in the background. This was going to be an easy one. I loved doing it, but I did ‘doctor up’ it up just a little, you know, a little more muscle, longer legs, what I thought would enhance it.  I showed it to Jim Cawley ~a horse expert and friend~  to  have him critique it before I delivered it . His comment was, “Dang, that is a fine horse but that is NOT Bob’s horse!”, so I started over from scratch and painted Bob’s real horse. Jim taught me a lot about horses, I have had to remove the perfectly painted whiskers in a horse portrait, re-work the eyes (moon eyes are not acceptable) and  every horse has to be the exact color. Horses have four legs, sometimes I would have liked to have painted them standing in tall grass, the legs are no fun.

Beauty Pageant

Miss Austin Pageant

You can see the lightning through the windows. I am 5th from the left between the castanets girl and the red hot mama. Miss Austin is 7th from the right~

While I was at UT in the fifties, a friend at the dorm was going to try out for the Tex-Annes, the school dance team. She asked me to go with her, and we both came back that day as new members. The qualifications were: be skinny, do high kicks and show up at practice. It was fun, there were about 14 girls in the group. Several times we went  to San Antonio to entertain at Brooke Army Hospital.  One of the girls sang ‘red hot mama’ songs, she was good. In March of 1953, there was a beauty contest to name Miss Austin, (the first leg of a journey to crown a new Miss America.) They were having no luck getting girls to sign up so they came to  the Tex-Annes and asked if we would all participate. To qualify, you needed to own a bathing suit and an evening dress. The perks were you would be ridding in parades, be featured in the Austin Statesman, and forever more be linked to the famous Miss America Pageant. (whether it ‘ever served us well’ remains to be seen, it has been over 60 years~ I am still waiting~) Anyway, the rules were:  #1, Show up at every rehearsal. #2, Show up on time. #3, Miss one single practice you are OUT! We watched as each tried to put together something for the talent contest. The best skit  was  the ‘Red Hot Mama’, followed closely by the short girl who had an authentic Mexican dress and played the castanets. After weeks of practice it was dress rehearsal time the night before the pageant at the Austin High School Auditorium. Then, in she walked~ this tall beautiful, confident long legged girl  we had never seen before. (The 3 big rules didn’t apply to lady long legs!) We kept whispering to each other, what’s going on!  We all limped through our routines and knew our Red Hot Mama or the castanets were not going to be winning after all. The next day, clouds came up and a storm was brewing. Mother and my sister Nancy, along with my friend Jimmy had come 200 miles to see the show, there were maybe 30 other people in the audience. The place was virtually empty. The show started, then the lights flickered off and on and off again, the building went dark, everything stopped. After  a while the lights came back on. That was the  story of the whole night with a sever thunderstorm, hail, power failure, the show was a disaster.They did crown Miss Austin that night and yes it was her~

When I am thinking back to this time, I realize everyone in this group is 80 or more years old,  many of them are already gone. Now the contest is which one will be the last one standing~


West Texas Chuck Wagon

The Camp Cook

I would think this was the best job around~

Harold Wood, who was in charge  of the LBJ Park near Johnson City once sent me an old  photograph of a camp cook with his chuck wagon and wanted me use it as a subject for an oil painting. I really enjoyed painting it and it hung in the Library and Conference Room at the park for several years. It reminded me of far West Texas and the Culberson County Ranch. Hunting camps still have camp cooks, usually one of the hunters takes on the job and does it year after year. Sometimes a real cook comes and gets to hunt for free. I can only imagine the men starting out early on a cold  morning with a big breakfast of scrambled eggs, boiled coffee and biscuits cooked in an old Dutch oven on the open fire, then heading out for the big hunt. This is where fathers bond with sons, brothers with brothers. This is where friendships are made that last a lifetime.

Pickled Beets

tasty, colorful, they add some zing, good for every day, every meal

This is a simple recipe for pickled beets. It is easy and fast and adds something special to any meal. They will keep well in the refrigerator for a week, if you can stay out of them~

Pickled Beets

2 cans whole or cut beets (drain but save
1/2 c. of the juice)
3/4 c. vinegar
3/4 c sugar

Put beets, vinegar, saved
beet juice and sugar in saucepan,
bring to a full boil. Let cool and store
in refrigerator until ready to use.

Oak Dining Chairs

Two little dining chairs

little chairs are the ‘comfort food’ for my eyes, they are my favorite miniatures to make.

These are two miniature dining chairs that are a part of a set of six. Each one has 19 pieces. After I made the pattern for the first one, I then cut the 114 pieces for all of them. Then they had to be sanded, fitted, glued together, stained and varnished. It went pretty fast and was a lot of fun to do. Making the chair bottoms took some time, the cording on the cushions was tedious since they are so small. The chairs are 9 1/2″ tall and copied from a real set of chairs from my grandmother. I restored the real ones several years ago and found $4.75 marked on the undersides indicating the price. A  little chair, lamp table and  the accessories can fit in almost any place and make a nice and interesting little set up. People either like little things or they don’t, I like those who do~

Texas Pecan Pralines

Wonderful homemade pralines

This is one of my all time favorites, make them once and you will be remembered for them~

This is a recipe you will want to make often, these pralines will melt in your mouth. (there is another recipe for the creamy, chewy kind that I will post later) The secret to making wonderful pralines is to toast the pecans first. I always toast pecans that are going into any candy recipe. This was my Grandmother Montgomery’s favorite candy to cook~

                        PECAN   PRALINES
1-Cup Sugar
½ Cup Brown Sugar
½ Cup Water
2 Tablespoons Light Karo
1 Tablespoon Vinegar
Pinch of Salt
1 Tablespoon Butter
3 to 4 Cups toasted pecans
(toast pecans in  microwave for about 2 or 2 1/2 minutes
two cups at a time. Stir every 30 seconds so they
don’t overcook.) Generiously butter a cookie sheet.
Combine the sugars, water, Karo, salt, and vinegar. Stir to mix well.  Wipe
down the sides of the pan with moist paper towel to prevent sugar crystals
from forming.  Cook to 234 degrees on candy thermometer.
Remove from stove, add butter and nuts and beat until the mixture starts
to thicken and loose its shine. Quickly drop from spoon to the buttered cookie sheet, using
a second spoon to scrape it off. If it should get too thick and sugary, just add a
few drops of water and beat. Cool, and wrap in wax paper, store for any length of time.
As with any candy, don’t double recipe and cook in a very heavy pan.
Makes about 20 pralines.